‘This Miraculous Hall of Mirrors’ – In Action!

Here is a scene from the actual film. William and two ladies falling over him.

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Here is the first girl and her outfit:

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Here is the first girl and her makeup:

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The second girl and her outfit:

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Here is the second girl and her makeup:

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And the two girls together:

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Here is William’s first outfit and makeup:

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This is William’s second outfit and makeup:

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Here is the narrator and his outfit and makeup:

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The Miraculous Hall of Mirrors

 

This term I did CMS for ‘The Miraculous Hall of Mirrors’, A film by Nevena Jablanovic. It is a fantasy film about a greedy man who goes through various events that lead him to a life-changing choice that has to be made. Here are the mood boards for the protagonist, William and the events that happen in the narrative.

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1900 – 1909: Mother-Daughter Relationship

“My mother… she is beautiful, softened at the edges and tempered with a spine of steel. I want to grow old and be like her.” – Jodi Picoult.

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The world saw the birth of invention history in the decade of 1900 – 1909. Streetcars, electric lights and the telephone were being developed and in 1903, the Wright Brothers made their first flight in a power, controlled “heavier-than-air-plane” (Unknown, 2007) in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The following year, the New York City subway opened. This decade also saw the invention of the lie detector (polygraph machine) and Albert Einstein’s famous equation E = mc2. Relationships were strong and world morale was high. 

South Africa was struggling. War was underway, from 1899 until 1902, and all African groups, were at a disadvantage. In 1904, a bout of the bubonic plague hit South Africa in Fietas, Johannesburg. This brought about the first township in South Africa, Klipspruit, which was established the following year. This township was the first African-only area in South Africa, and the first attempt of racial separation. 

In 1907, The Education Act, Act No. 25 of 1907 was passed, which stipulated that all children of African groups were forbidden from European schools, and separate schools were the solution. The separation between African and Caucasian groups was growing even larger. In 1908, in the Transvaal, The Immorality Amendment Ordinance Act, No. 16 of 9018 forbidding relations between White and Coloured persons was passed. Finally, in 1909, South African was declared a Union in the British Parliament, although all legislation against African groups remains unscathed. In South Africa, this was a time where relationships were challenged and people’s strength was tested.

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In the early 1900’s, due to the birth of a variety of inventions in the world, fashion to wanted to cling to the past. Trends for men and women, were heavily influenced by fashion from the 1890’s. Women continued to wear tall, rigid collars, broad hats and the full “Gibson girl” (Unknown, 2007) hairstyle, and men maintained the long, slender and athletic profile brought about in the 1890’s. The ideal woman of the 1900’s was elegant, tall, confident, and had a full, low chest and curvy hips. 

Minimalism was not an option for the 1900’s. 1908 saw the beginnings of the Parisian ‘Haute Couture’, which lead the fashion for women of all classes. Accessories were the ‘craze’, with large hats that had an accumulation of feathers, ribbons and artificial flowers. If one could afford it, some would even have stuffed birds on their hats (male hummingbirds were the ideal). The parasol formed part of the accessories enthusiasm, with the main aim to support women when they stood or walked, due to hats being so large and flamboyant. Corsets were still very much in fashion, as the hourglass or “s-curve” formed part of the ideal silhouette for a woman. Fashion was taken to another level though, when corsets became too tight, and started affecting how women’s bodies grew.

Children’s fashion imitated older women’s fashion of the same period, with children’s dresses resembling those of older women’s lingerie dresses. The dresses had hems made of lace, and were trimmed to the knee.

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(Hope you all Enjoyed! :))

Reference: SA History

  1. Unknown. (n.d). Liberation History Timeline 1900 – 1909. [Online]. Available at: http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/liberation-history-timeline-1900-1909 [Accessed 26 May 2014].

Reference: World History

  1. Unknown. (n.d). 1900 – 1909 World History. [Online]. Available at: http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005245.html [Accessed 26 may 2014].

Reference: Fashion

  1. Unknown. (2007). 1900’s. [Online]. Available at: http://fashionhistory.zeesonlinespace.net/p1900s.html [Accessed 21 May 2014].
  2. Gibson girl hair: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X72_1cOARX8.
  3. Ivy, M. (2014). “1900 – 19060’s fashion”, Lecture/Class, AFDA The South African School of Motion Picture Medium and Live Performance, unpublished.

1910 – 1919: Father-Daughter Relationship

“Walk alongside me daddy, and hold my little hand. I have so many things to learn that I don’t yet understand… Every child needs a gentle hand, to guide them as they grow. So walk alongside me daddy. We have a long way to go.” – Helen Bush.

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The 1910 – 1919 decade was a time of war and destruction. The Ouaddai War occurred in 1909 – 1911 between France and the Ouaddai Kingdom. In the following year, The First Balkan War occurred in 1912 – 1913 between the Balkan League (Greece, Serbia, Bulgaria and Montenegro) and The Ottoman Empire. In this year, the famous ‘Titanic’, known as the “unsinkable ship”, sunk after hitting an iceberg. With over 1, 517 deaths, this catastrophe was known as the one of the deadliest maritime disasters in history. But the most infamous of happenings in this era was World War One.

‘The Great War’ began in 1914. The Allies (United Kingdom, France and the Russian Empire) were at war with the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary. No other conflict has involved so many participants in previous history. With the first extensive bombing from the air, and some of the first mass-civilian massacres, more than nine million participants were killed

South Africa was also a part of World War I, with more than 146 000 white, 83 000 black and 2500 mixed race South Africans taking part. ‘The Great War’ ended in 1918, with about 18 600 South African casualties. This was a time of sadness amongst families with men leaving for war, mothers and daughters not knowing if they would see their husband, father, son or brother again. However, on the 18th of July 1918, in South Africa, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born; the man who would change South African and world history.

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The first half of the 1910-decade saw rich and luxurious fashion. juxtaposed with the practicaliy of clothing worn during World War I. For women, the ideal silhouette softened. Waistlines were loose with the abandonment of the corset, and by mid-decade had dropped to the natural waist. The most popular shape of the decade was a tunic over a long underskirt. By mid-decade, skirts were widest at the hips and very narrow at the ankle. Fur coats were also very popular during this decade. The “teens” (Unknown, n.d) introduced the sewing machine to the fashion world.

During World War I, men and women simplified their dress due to contributing funds to the war. Women were forced to work, which lead to a demand for clothing better suited to the working environment. This included shirtwaists, tailored suits, darker colours and simpler cuts. Skirts were shortened in a style that was recognized as patriotic and practical, known as the “war crinoline”.

The men’s overall ‘look’ was slimmer and more youthful than the previous decade, with hair being worn short and moustaches curled. Informal and semi-formal fashion was a three-piece suit comprising of a ‘sack’ or ‘lounge’ coat, with no padding, a matching waistcoat and trousers. Waistcoats fastened lower on the chest and were collarless, with ascot ties for formal day dress and white bow ties for evening dress. Accompanying this look were soft felt Homburgs, or stiff bowler hats. There was flexibility with this look, as colours were sometimes mixed-and-matched in the outfit.

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AND A FEW MORE PICTURES JUST BECAUSE I COULDN’T DECIDE WHICH ONES WERE MY FAVOURITE!!! :D

(Let me know which ones are YOUR faves! ;) )

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(Hope you all enjoyed! :))

Reference: SA History

  1. Unknown. (n.d). Liberation History Timeline 1910 – 1919. [Online]. Available at: http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/liberation-history-timeline-1910-1919 [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  2. Unknown. (n.d). Nelson Mandela Timeline 1910 – 1919. [Online]. Available at: http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/nelson-mandela-timeline-1910-1919 [Accessed 26 May 2014].

Reference: World History

  1. Unknown. (2014). 1910’s. [Online]. Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1910s#Wars [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  2. Rosenberg, J. (n.d). Sinking of the Titanic. [Online]. Available at: http://history1900s.about.com/od/1910s/p/titanic.htm [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  3. Unknown. (n.d). World War I. [Online]. Available at: http://www.worldwar-1.net [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  4. Unknown. (n.d). 1910 – 1919 World History. [Online]. Available at: http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005246.html [Accessed 26 may 2014].

Reference: Fashion

  1. Unknown. (n.d). Fashion Overview. [Online]. Available at: http://www.revampvintage.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=OVERVIEW [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  2. Unknown. (2014). 1910’s in Western Fashion. [Online]. Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1910s_in_Western_fashion [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  3. Unknown. (n.d). 1910’s. [Online]. Available at: http://fashionhistory.zeesonlinespace.net/p1910s.html [Accessed 26 May 2014].
  4. Unknown. (n.d). Menswear 1910 – 1919. [Online] Available at: http://costumereference.weebly.com/menswear-1910s.html [Accessed 26 May 2014].

100 Years of Fashion

Hi guys! Sorry i’ve been so absent. SWAMPED with work, but here is the latest and greatest from CMS (Costume, Makeup and Styling)!

So, our assignment for term 2 and 3 is to create a book consisting of fashion from the 1900 – 2010. The requirements are at LEAST one photo per decade and a 500 word abstract about the decade (250 words of history and 250 words of fashion history). 

My concept is relationships/love throughout the decades (still working on the title – “Timeless Love”, or “Love of the Ages”? If you have cool ideas, let me know!), and i’m trying to focus mainly on South African history, as I feel it should be explored more in-depth as not many people know about it, although I want it to be a book for everyone to enjoy! :)

For this week we had to choose 2 decades between 1900 – 1960 and a cover photo for the book. I chose to do the 1900 and 19010 decades. I’ll post what I have so far in the following post, so stay tuned! ;)

 

Second Year, Term 1 Film at AFDA

This is one of the films that I worked on this term. It is a delightful comedy-horror for everyone to enjoy! Please Like it, Comment on it, Share it and let the world know about it! Hope you all enjoy :)

“Mr. Baker, a friendly small-town baker whose life is shrouded in routine and devoted service to his most loyal customer, Gerald, is shaken when a rival baker opens up across the street and steals his most loyal customer. He jealously plots to kidnap and murder the new baker and win Gerald back, but not all goes according to plan…”

2013 Serial Killer Assignment

The Protagonist: Anna Starling. Anna is an amateur detective who has just been assigned her biggest case yet! A sick cardiologist who cuts out his victims’ hearts. Little does she know that this case might just be her biggest break in the company, but also the worst.

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The Antagonist: James Green. James is a cardiologist, or was. He was performing a transplant on his only daughter, Julia, which is illegal, and he lost her as well as his job at a prestigious hospital. He now “practices” in his own home on random blonde-haired, blue-eyed girls whom he lures into his custody, only to cut their hearts out in a desperate attempt to save his dead daughter. These endeavours never work, and he is left infuriated and more driven than before.

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The Deuteragonist: Julia Green. is James Green’s only daughter. She was killed during a heart transplant which Green was performing himself. Her body is now kept in a golden coffin, dressed in a white silk garment, where she “awaits” her father’s desperate attempt to resurrect her.

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Vicim 1: Victoria is an eighteen year-old student. James approached her, and, thinking that he was a lecturer, Victoria accepted his kind offer of a private lesson at his home. She was made unconscious and severed on his home stair case.

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Victim 2: Susie is an eight year-old girl in primary school. Her mother was late to fetch her, and charming Mr. James Green was there to “rescue” her to take her home to her mommy. Green murdered her in his own bedroom, and left her rotting corpse in a suitcase.

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Victim 3: Ellie was a high school student, sixteen years old. She was catching a taxi home after visiting the mall with her friend. Green took her to his home and removed her heart on his very own surgery table. The body was left there and then.

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Samantha is the assistant detective helping on Starling’s case. As the investigation gets deeper, so does Green’s fascination with Channing. One night, Channing goes to investigate Green’s house, only to find out that he is at home. She murdered in his shower, her heart left on the crime scene. Channing’s death was the most gruesome of all of Green’s murders.

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Character and Mood Boards

This term, one of the films I am working on is an animation called ‘Neighbours’ by the very talented Kabelo Maaka.

Synopsis of script:

‘Neighbours’ (Maaka, 2014) is story about an old man, Elliot, who is very stuck in his ways. He has his daily routine and does not want anyone to intrude on his life. He is very happy with the way things are, until the day when Sachin moves into the neighbourhood. Sachin is the exact opposite of Elliot – young, energetic, friendly, charismatic and driven. All he wants is to make friends and have fun. It seems that they are too opposite to have a friendship, however, when Isha, Sachin’s girlfriend, leaves him, Elliot extends the hand of friendship. His wife also left him. After this comforting moment, they become friends.

Elliot: Mood Board

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Elliot is an elderly man very set in his own ways and enjoys his routine. His mood board reflects this with the way the pictures have been compiled together – neatly and structured. His colour palette is dark reflecting his introvert side. He is an elderly man so slippers, books and a ball of wool reflect this. These images also reflect comfort, which is the way he feels in his routine and everyday life. The picture of the soldiers marching reflects his daily routine that must not be disrupted. The picture of a grey bird shows that Elliot is lonely, which is explained with another picture of an elderly couple. This shows the audience that something has happened to the wife. The picture of the sandwich in the shape of a heart shows that Elliot needs comforting, and this will be achieved with love. Food is also comforting for some people.

Elliot: Character Board

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On Elliot’s character board we see his actual character (what he will look like) as well as the colour palette that the character will appear in. Elliot is very stuck in his ways – a real introvert, therefore his colour palette is dark colours, such as black, chocolate brown and dark blue. Elliot is an elderly man so he will be dressed in comfortable attire – a fluffy dressing gown (to be made from a face cloth), comfortable slippers (to be made from beads and cotton wool) and reading glasses (that will be made from wire). The actual character will be made from clay. Elliot’s eyes will be black beads and his hair, beard and moustache will be cotton wool.

Sachin: Mood Board

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Sachin is the exact opposite of Elliot – young, energetic, friendly, charismatic and driven. All he wants is to make friends and have fun. His mood board reflects this with a structured collage of images. The structure explains that he is driven and hardworking, and the collage part shows his fun, energetic side. His colour palette is bright with reds and oranges. On the board are inspirational words, such as discovery and success, to reflect Sachin’s personality. Also on the board are pictures of love and a girl to show his relationship with his girlfriend. More specifically, the girl is Indian to show that Sachin is Indian too. The board also emphasises a lot on technology, such as cars, a BlackBerry Messenger ‘pin code’, cell phone and a camera to represent Sachin’s success. There are also pictures to show that he is well travelled, which will tie into his personality as well as his culture.